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Toronto Catholic District School Board

Deaf And Hard Of Hearing
 
Welcome to Dante's Deaf & Hard of Hearing Department.
 
Dante is the home for approximately 30 Deaf & Hard of Hearing students of varying audiological, ethnic and religious backgrounds. Our students come to us from a very large geographic boundary.
 
Our students use a wide variety of techniques to access their education.
 
    Specialized personnel:
        - Sign Language Interpreters
        - Oral Interpreters
        - Communication Facilitators
        - Specialized Teachers of the Deaf
 
     Specialized technology:
        - Hearing aids
        - Coclear Implants
        - FM Systems

Who We Are
 
Department Head
    Ms. D. Plestid
 
Teachers of the Deaf
    Ms. S. Arnold
    Mr. A. Tocco
    Ms. T. Florio
    Ms. S. MacMillan

 Sign Language Interpreters
    Ms. A. Davis
    Ms. L. Ball
 
Oral Interpreters
    Ms. L. Addesi
    Ms. K. McGovern-Iannarelli
 
Communication Facilitator
    Ms. A. Zammit
 
F.A.Q.'s
 
Is Sign Language Universal?
 
    - No. In fact countries around the world have their own signed languages. A system known as "Gestuno" was developed to assist in international conferences. Much like Esparano for speaking based conferences. Also, like English can have many dialects and accents across the country, so too can American Sign Language!
 
So, if it's called American Sign Language what do we use in Canada?
 
    - American Sign Language (ASL) is a generic term that covers all of North America. Execpt for regional sign variations, Deaf persons all over the U.S. and Canada can understand each other. Like we have to study French in school, Sign Language is different in Quebec. (Langues de Signes Quebecois) which is, of course, different than French Sign Language in France.
 
 All deaf people can lipread, right?
 
    - No. Lipreading is a very difficult skill to master. Many of the speech sounds we make are created behind the lips involving the teeth and tongue placement. If the speaker is not looking at the deaf person or has facial hair it makes it even more challenging to understand. If you encounter a deaf person who can lipread, speak in a natural, non-exaggerated way.

What is the difference between a Sign Language Interpreter and an Oral Interpreter?
 
    - A Sign Language Interpreter is trained to interpret between a Signed Language and a Spoken Language providing a complete contextually accurate message. In the school that would be ASL and English.
    - An Oral Interpreter is trained to listen to a message and re-express it clearly on the lips for a lipreading Deaf person. They may choose synonyms for hard to lipread words. They may also incorporate gestures or simple signs to make the message a clear as possible.

Pictures
 
 

 Deaf and Hard of Hearing Pictures

 

GBC/Mayfest 2010

 
 
 
Links
 
General
 
Educational
 
                   - American Sign Language Interpreter Program
 
Deaf Department Alumni - What They're Up To Now
 
 
​Graduate Year Graduated​ Graduated From​ Where Are They Now?​
Althea Villegas ​ June 26, 2008 ​ Currently at George Brown College 2009 and studying Art and Design Foundation. ​
Diane Da Costa ​ June 26, 2008 ​ Currently at York University studying Mathematics ​
Mathew Fenton ​ June 26, 2008 ​ Currently at Sheridan Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning and Studying Travel & Tourism.  ​
Renae Diedrick ​ June 26, 2008 ​ Currently attending George Brown College Studying ASL and Deaf studies.​
Robin Bailey ​ June 26, 2008 ​ Currently waiting to enter College. Still shooting videos with Suroal gals ​
Alexandra Hickox ​ June 21, 2007​ Currently attending OCAD studying Photography ​
Mohammad El Char ​ June 28, 2006 ​ Currently a Freshman @ Gallaudet University studying mathematics under Bachelor of Science (Bsc).​
Agustina Armani ​ June 24, 2004 ​ York University in Bachelor of Arts 2007 - Sociology; Honours in Sociology - 2008;  ​ Currently attending Lakehead University's Orillia Campus Sept 2009 for Bachelor of Education Teacher's College Program ​
Lucia Jackson ​ June 25, 1998 ​ York University BA -2003 Geography & B.Ed. in Deaf Education; AQ course for Science 2006 ​ Milton - E.C.Drury School for the Deaf - Junior/Intermediate/Senior Geography Teacher ​
Jack Racanelli ​ June 26, 1997 ​ York University - 2009 Psychology ​ Member of theatre group ​
Abigail Danquah ​ Abigail (Nana) attended Dante from 2002 - 2004. She is now currently enrolled in National Technical Institute for the Deaf in Rochester Institute of Techology - Major in Business Accounting for Associate of Applied Science degree. ​
 
 
Extra-Curricular (After-school) Interpreter Request
 
Before you make an appointment check here to see who is available at what time.
Try to schedule appointments when interpreter is available and it does not conflict with your classes.
 
Period 1 - Ms. Ball - ASL or Ms. Addesi - Oral
Period 2 - No interpreters available except in emergency; then maybe Ms. Ball
Period 3 - Ms. Davis - ASL or Ms. McGovern - Oral (Beatrice)
Period 4 - No interpreters available except in emergency; then maybe Ms. Ball
 
Also be aware that appointments for Guidance are to be made with the counsellor assigned to the Deaf & Hard of Hearing Department only. Not your alpha counsellor.
 
This year's counsellor is: Mr. Flores
If you need an appointment with him please email at: josealberto.flores@tcdsb.org