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Toronto Catholic District School Board

Technological Studies
 
The Role of Technological Education
 
Like other areas of the curriculum, technological education is changing in response to changing needs. As recently as ten years ago, technology programs focused primarily on teaching students the knowledge and skills they needed to carry out the specialized tasks associated with a particular, well-defined occupation. Recently, however, the nature of the workplace has altered significantly – partly because of a dramatic increase in the pace of technological change. People's occupations are less likely to fit into neat, easily defined categories, and the lines between different types of work are less rigidly drawn. In order to do their jobs effectively, workers in one field often need to know how developments in other fields affect their own activities, and what impact their work will have upon other people and upon the environment.
 
As "job descriptions" become broader and more general, workers will need to be competent in a number of different areas, and be able and willing to learn about and use new procedures and emerging technologies. In short, workers increasingly need both a commitment to lifelong learning and a variety of "transferable skills" – skills that will allow them to respond to changing conditions by using their existing knowledge and expertise in new ways.
 
The courses outlined in the present document are designed to respond to the new nature of the workplace by broadening the scope of technological education. Programs  enable students to understand and apply a range of concepts and to acquire skills that they can use for a variety of purposes. Programs  also ensure that students come to understand the ways in which technology, society, and the environment interact. Programs will continue to include the study of the invention and operation of machines and other design and production procedures; but they must also include the study of human processes, environmental systems, and the impact of technology on society and the environment. In addition, programs will help students to understand that technology is a force for change and enable them to develop the attitudes and values they need to meet the challenges it presents.
 
Key Features of Technological Education Programs
 
The changing nature of the workplace has created a need for technology programs that have the following key features.  
 
Programs  promote integrated learning. That is, they  help students to see how their learning in one area is connected to their learning in another and to conditions in the real world. An integrated program uses a theme or group of activities to link several subject areas, thus allowing students to acquire knowledge, skills, and values that are relevant to more than one topic or field. Programs  enable students to make connections between the various technological subjects, and also between technological subjects and other areas of the curriculum.

Programs  emphasize problem solving, with a focus on problems that lend themselves to more than one type of solution, or that may require novel types of solutions. Through this type of "open-ended" problem solving, students gain valuable experience in identifying, analysing, defining, and solving many different types of problems. The "open-ended" aspect is important to reflect conditions in the real world, where the problems students are likely to encounter will not always be clear-cut. This approach to problem solving is discussed in more detail in the next section, "The Main Components of Broad-based Technology Programs".

Programs  emphasize the process of problem solving as well as the product or solution. In order to solve problems, students will use a number of basic problem-solving techniques. Taken together, these techniques add up to a "process" that can be used consistently to find solutions to many different types of problems. The ability to use a particular process or group of techniques to solve problems is a valuable "transferable skill" – one that can be used in many different situations and for a variety of purposes. Students need to identify and become thoroughly familiar with the steps in the process they are using; to help them do so, they will be required to maintain a record of their activities for each project. This record, which could take the form of a design brief, a technological report, or some similar type of documentation, will also be used in evaluating student performance.

Programs use projects, and the activities and tasks required to complete them, as the primary means through which students learn the subject matter and reach the expected outcomes for the course or program. Projects may be very broad in scope (e.g., a multi-component project undertaken by the whole class) or may be narrow and focused (e.g., a project to learn a specific skill used in making part of a product). Each program should expose students to a variety of types of projects.

Programs  emphasize learning by doing. That is, the students should acquire knowledge and skills primarily through doing the specific tasks required to complete a project, rather than from texts or teacher instruction. Students understand concepts and procedures more readily when they encounter them first through concrete examples.

Programs emphasize independent and small-group learning activities. Programs that use this approach are called "student centred". The purpose of using a student-centred format is to enable students to take progressively more responsibility for their own learning in preparation for a workplace that requires responsible, self-motivated workers capable of taking on new challenges.

In a student-centred program, a wide variety of learning resources will be available for students' use, and teachers often act as facilitators and resource persons rather than delivering direct instruction in formal lessons. Student self-assessment and peer evaluation are used along with teacher evaluation in a student-centred program.
 
Design and Technology
 
Technological Design – TDJ
 
All courses are integrated, student centred, and activity based. They use projects as the primary vehicle for learning, must emphasize open-ended problem solving, and focus on the process as well as the product or solution. They include the study of the three major areas (physical products, human processes, and environmental systems).
 
Technological design programs include the in-depth study of a variety of design processes that may be used in solving any technological challenge or problem.
 
Technological design programs expose students to diverse and complex design processes and problems. Emphasis is placed on the redesigning of a product, process, or system to produce one that better meets the particular need. Students should take progressively greater responsibility for identifying their own design problems and developing their own optimum solutions with minimal involvement from the teacher. To enhance their ability to make responsible decisions about the use of technology in their everyday lives, students should be given numerous opportunities to explore real-world applications of technology and the use of a wide variety of design processes.
 
Every student, on completion of a technological design program, will be given the opportunity to acquire the knowledge, skills, and values for all of the following learning outcomes.
 
Learning Outcomes for Technological Design:
  • Students will describe and evaluate, using practical and theoretical means, a variety of design processes that may be used in solving technological problems.
  • Students will apply a variety of design processes to solve technological problems in the areas of communications, construction, hospitality services, manufacturing, personal services, and transportation.
  • Students will identify and analyse the relationship between design processes and the ten concepts used in technological education (structure, material, fabrication, mechanism, power and energy, controls, systems, function, aesthetics, and ergonomics).
  • Students will apply appropriate methods of open-ended problem solving, working as individuals and in small groups, to investigate, analyse, and resolve technological design problems related to physical, human/social, and environmental concerns.
  • Students will select and safely use the appropriate technologies, materials, tools, and equipment in developing solutions to design-related technological problems.
  • Students will select and use appropriate information technologies when developing solutions to design-related technological problems.
  • Students will identify, describe, analyse, and use the personal-management skills that are necessary for success in the workplace.
  • Students will identify and describe the principles related to lifelong learning.
  • Students will identify and assess career opportunities in technological design, and the entry requirements for those careers.
Course Descriptions 
 
(TDJ2O) Grade10
 
This course requires students to design and develop innovative products and services. Students will learn the following: how to identify user needs related to specified design problems; the physical properties of selected materials and their application in product design; techniques to create physical products and services; various presentation techniques; how to test and evaluate design solutions; and the implications of technology on the development of products or services. They will also become aware of design-related careers.
 
(TDJ3E/M) Grade11
 
This course provides students with opportunities to apply the principles of basic design to technological challenges in industry, engineering, architecture, manufacturing, and graphics. Students will develop problem-solving and design skills through the use of technical drawings and illustrations, model building, testing, and marketing. They will also become aware of consumer, business, and environmental issues in the creation and marketing of products or services, and the educational requirements of design-related careers.
 
(TDJ4E/M) Grade 12
 
This course helps students develop a systematic process to design products or services based on an understanding and analysis of consumer needs, material characteristics, fabrication methods, and design principles. Students will develop design briefs, conduct marketing surveys, create freehand and computer-generated illustrations, make models, generate technical reports, design packaging, and become aware of design trends. They will also examine careers and small business opportunities in design, architecture, manufacturing, or marketing.
 
Communication Technology
 
Communications Technology – TGJ
 
This communications technology program  builds on and forms a continuum with the technology portion of the Grades 7, 8, and 9 programs.
 
This course is integrated, student centred, and activity based. It uses projects as the primary vehicle for learning,  emphasizes open-ended problem solving, and  focuses on the process as well as the product or solution. The course includes the study of the three major areas (physical products, human processes, and environmental systems) and the ten concepts used in technological education.
Communications technology program includes the study of electronic, live, and graphic communications; and focuses on two or more of these topics.
  • "Electronic communications" could include the study of television production, editing, and transmission (air wave and cable); audio recording and amplification; and communication devices such as telephones, fax machines, and computers. The transmission and receiving of communications signals using radio waves, line-of-sight signals, microwaves, satellites, fibre optics, cable, or any other means are relevant parts of the study of electronic communications systems.
  • "Live communications" includes the study of photography (moving and still) and stage productions. Lighting, art work, and other design aspects of the process of creating illusions and functional environments for live communications systems.
  • "Graphic communications"  includes the study of print materials, desktop publishing, computer graphics, drafting methods, and printing systems.
 
Every student, on completion of a communications technology program, has been given the opportunity to acquire the knowledge, skills, and values for all of the following learning outcomes.
 
Learning Outcomes for Communications Technology:
  • Students will describe and evaluate, using practical and theoretical means, types of video, audio, and other electronic communications systems, including computers.
  • Students will describe and evaluate, using practical and theoretical means, types of live communications systems.
  • Students will describe and evaluate, using practical and theoretical means, types of graphic communications systems.
Students will identify and analyse the relationships among the ten concepts used in technological education (structure, material, fabrication, mechanism, power and energy
Course Descriptions 
                   
Grade 10, Open (TGJ2O) Communications Technology
 
This course introduces students to communications technology from a media perspective.  Students will work in the areas of TV/video and movie production, radio and audio production, print and graphic communications, photography, and animation. Student projects will include computer-based activities such as creating videos, editing photos, working with audio, cartooning, developing animations, and designing web pages. Students will also develop an awareness of environmental and societal issues related to communications technology and explore secondary and postsecondary education and training pathways and career opportunities in the various communications technology fields.
 
Prerequisite: None
 
Grade 11 (TGJ3M)Communications Technology University/CollegePreparation    

This course examines communications technology from a media perspective. Students will develop knowledge and skills as they design and produce media projects in the areas of live, recorded, and graphic communications. These areas may include TV, video, and movie production; radio and audio production; print and graphic communications; photography; digital imaging; broadcast journalism; and interactive new media. Students will also develop an awareness of related environmental and societal issues and explore college and university programs and career opportunities in the various communications technology fields.
 
Prerequisite: None. Recommended Preparation TGJ2O

Grade 11,Open(TGJ3O) Communications Technology Broadcast and Print Production
 
This course enables students to develop knowledge and skills in the areas of graphic communication, printing and publishing, audio and video production, and broadcast journalism. Students will work both independently and as part of a production team to design and produce media products in a project-driven environment. Practical projects may include the making of signs, newspapers, video and/or audio productions, newscasts, and documentaries. Students will also develop an awareness of related environmental and societal issues and explore secondary and postsecondary education and training pathways and career opportunities in the various communications technology fields.
 
Prerequisite: None. Recommended Preparation TGJ2O
 
Grade 12, (TGJ4M) Communications Technology University/College Preparation
 
This course enables students to further develop media knowledge and skills while designing and producing projects in the areas of live, recorded, and graphic communications. Students may work in the areas of TV, video, and movie production; radio and audio production; print and graphic communications; photography; digital imaging; broadcast journalism; and interactive new media. Students will also expand their awareness of environmental and societal issues related to communications technology and will investigate career opportunities and challenges in a rapidly changing technological environment.
 
Prerequisite: Grade 11, TGJ3M University/College Preparation. Recommended Preparation TGJ2O
 
Grade 12  Open (TGJ4O) Communications Technology: Digital Imagery and Web Design
 
This course enables students to develop knowledge and skills in the areas of photography, digital imaging, animation, 3D modelling, and web design. Students will work both independently and as part of a production team to design and produce media products in a project-driven environment. Practical projects may include photo galleries, digital images, animations, 3D models, and websites. Students will also expand their awareness of environmental and societal issues related to communications technology and explore postsecondary education, training, and career opportunities.
 
Prerequisite: None. Recommended Preparation TGJ3O
 
 
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