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Toronto Catholic District School Board

Assessment And Testingelearning.jpg
EQAO Assessments (Pri./Jr.)
When the EQAO Results come home, you will want to know some things about EQAO and what all the marks mean:

 

 
1. What do the results mean?
Level 1 – 50% - 59% or a “D” ;
Level 2 – 60% - 69% or a “C”
Level 3 – 70% - 79% or a “B” ;
Level 4 – 80% - 100% or a “A” 

 

 
2. Do the results count on student’s report cards?
Grades 3 and 6 tests do not count as part of a student’s mark or progress.  
 
3. When are results available to parents?
Results are available to parents in the fall. Results are forwarded to the new
school for students who have changed schools since writing the tests. 
 
4. How can I get more information?
Follow this link: www.eqao.com/parents
 
 
The document below is a guide for parents to reference in order to better understand what the EQAO Assessment is and what it is not.  Click the link below:
 

 

 
Progress Report (November)
 
The fall Progress Report places a very strong emphasis on the development of students' LEARNING SKILLS and WORK HABITS. Students' achievement of six Learning Skills and Work Habits are shown on the front page of the Progress Report. These are:
 
(1) Responsibility              (2) Organization           (3) Independent Work 
 
(4) Collaboration               (5) Initiative                   (6) Self-Regulation 
Image result for learning skills and work habits 
 
The development of these skills and habits will be reported as "excellent", "good", "satisfactory" or "needs improvement" and a large space is provided for teacher comments about students' strengths and areas for improvement.
 
Ministry of Education policy places an emphasis on teachers using the Progress Report as a stepping stone to conduct rich discussions and proactive interviews or conferences with parents and/or students at this time.  This is an opportunity to help establish or further strengthen a positive tone for the remainder of the year. 
 
Please note that the Progress Report Card is an assessment and no evaluation mark or specific strand is indicated or required.  In the history of education, no student has achieved an "A" on the second page of a Report Card without well developed work habits and refined learning skills!
 
For more information, click below to take you to the TCDSB site on Report Cards:

 

 

Elementary Provincial Report Card (February and June)  Image result for ontario provincial report card
 
The Report Card (Progress Report and Elementary Provincial Report Card) will be given to students three times a year, in the fall, in the spring, and in June. It reflects the Learning Skills, Work Habits, and Curriculum Expectations for each term. This means that the June Report Card reflects the curriculum expectations of the third term only and not for the entire year. For each reporting period, the mark or grade given identifies the most consistent level of achievement of your child for the subject or strand. This achievement is based on a variety of assessments of the skills and knowledge of the curriculum expectations.
 
The Elementary Provincial Report Card indicates for parents how well their children are progressing in all the subjects and provides indication of those subjects where the student may need additional help. The marks are indicative of much, but the interview process is still a valuable tool to allow for students to further achieve success.
 
The following are some points to consider when reading the Ontario Provincial Report Card
 
When reporting on Knowledge and Understanding, you may see such words:
 
Level 1:  rather limited understanding/knowledge
Level 2:  somewhat limited understanding/knowledge
Level 3:  considerable/good understanding/knowledge
Level 4:  solid/thorough understanding/knowledge
 
When reporting on Thinking, Communication and Application, you may see such words:
 
Level 1:  limited effectiveness
Level 2:  some effectiveness
Level 3:  considerable effectiveness
Level 4:  high degree of effectiveness
 
You can also do to the Ministry of Education website at:
 In general, when reading your child’s report card, you will see wording as such:

 

Level 1: with plenty of reminders, with increased assistance, with constant teacher supervision,   
               limited understanding, struggles with, requires remedial assistance, marginal progress
 
Level 2: with some reminders, with less teacher supervision, a basic understanding,
               requires more care, use time more effectively, moderate progress 
 
Level 3:  good understanding, readily able to, uses time effectively, attentive to details,
                demonstrates appropriate behaviour and understanding, good progress,
 
Level 4:  confidently, thorough, solid understanding, effectively uses, consistently, accurately,
                intuitively, always displays a readiness to, easily uses, excellent/very good progress
 
Part of the Ontario Provincial Report Card is a section that reflects on Strengths/Next Steps.  This section focuses on some overall areas (expectations) that:  are strengths for your child; is an area for your child to begin to work on; is an area for your child to further develop and strengthen/improve; or is an area which needs to be more evident and/or more readily and explicitly demonstrated in class on a day-to-day basis.

 

Some comments you may see at each level of achievement in this area are:
 
Level 1:   lacking independent skills and initiative to organize work, inability to fully complete
                assignments, inattentive during discussions, needs to develop better work habits,
                stronger comprehension skills will develop by reading every night, take greater  
                initiative and ownership for own personal learning
 
Level 2:  slowly developing some independent skills and some initiative to organize work,
               inconsistently completes assignments, loses focus and attention during discussions,  
               work habits are gradually improving, continues to improve reading skills

 

Level 3: independent skills are steadily developing and is demonstrating initiative in daily work,
              regularly completes assignments, is attentive during discussions and work habits are  
              good, reading skills are well developed, continues reading for pleasure to further  
              expand sight vocabulary & strengthen comprehension skills
 
Level 4:  very co-operative and responsible, conscientious worker, effectively uses time to
              complete work, demonstrates plenty of motivation, personal initiative, very good work
              habits, reading skills are extremely well developed, reads without being told, reads to
              further expand and strengthen vocabulary base and comprehension skills

 

Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS)
 
The TIMSS 2011 International Results in Mathematics summarizes fourth and eighth grade student achievement in each of the 63 countries and 14 benchmarking entities which participated in TIMSS 2011.
 
Get the full TIMSS Report from 2011 ... click the pdf link below:
 
 
If you'd like to know more about what TIMSS is and get some practice on doing the TIMSS assessment, check out the links below:
 

 

 

Taking the TIMSS test online ... very neat and easy.  Click the Link:
 
 
BC TIMSS TEST INFO
Website for you to view "released items" ... these are questions and more that gets released after every TIMSS test.
 
Fantastic site for you to download, save, print the complete TIMSS test from 2011, 2003, 1999 in math and science.
 
Materials from BC who last participated in 2007

 

The Fraser Institute

 

The Report Card on Ontario’s Elementary Schools 2015 collects a variety of relevant, objective indicators of school performance into one, easily accessible public document so that anyone can analyze and compare the academic performance of individual schools on a number of standardized tests (i.e., EQAO).  By doing this, the Report Card on Ontario's Elementary Schools 2015 encourages and assists all those seeking to further improve their schools in some areas of school life.  The report for 2015 focussed on 3037 elementary schools in the province.

 

 
The Report Card on Ontario’s Elementary Schools 2015 collects a variety of relevant, objective indicators of school performance into one, easily accessible public document so that anyone can analyze and compare the academic performance of individual schools on a number of standardized tests (i.e., EQAO).  By doing this, the Report Card on Ontario's Elementary Schools 2015 encourages and assists all those seeking to further improve their schools in some areas of school life.  The report for 2015 focussed on 3037 elementary schools in the province.

Of the total schools looked at in this report in 2013-2014, you will find St. Albert ranked 1083 out of 3037 schools.  This is a slightly higher ranking result from previous years and we aspire to continue to work our way up the rankings in future years.  Please keep in mind the essence of this report does not consider the whole child and the entire scope of school life - it merely focuses on one aspect.  Nonetheless, our goal is to always support our students to be successful in their school life and academics is one of the many aspects of school life.
 
To read the full report, Report Card on Ontario’s Elementary Schools 2015, you can click on the title of the report above.
 
 

 

EQAO Grade 3 And Grade 6 Results


EQAO TESTS IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL - A Guide for Parents

This brochure will help you understand the two EQAO tests Ontario students write in elementary school and how you can use the results to support your child.

Students across Ontario write province-wide assessments of their reading, writing and math skills at key stages in their elementary and secondary school education.
http://www.rainbowschools.ca/parents/support/EQAO_ParentGuide_PrimaryJunior2011.pdf  ​