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                  Alumni 2015 to 2020
 

 

[Updated 24 August 2021]

Below, you will find the profiles of alumni who graduated from Newman between 2015 and the present day.

Alumni are listed in alpha order, by family name, in the table below as are their profiles.

​Alumnus ​Years at Newman
Christiana Augustin ​2011 - 2015
Niamh Haughey 2012 - 2016
Rosalyn [Rosie] Kish 2011 - 2015
 


Christiana Agustin 2011 – 2015
 
Christiana Agustin attended Blessed Cardinal Newman from 2011 to 2015, where she participated in Cross Country, Camp Olympia, Student Council and was a peer helper and mentor. She is currently attending the University of Toronto, where she is a fourth-year international development studies co-op student working in Bangkok, Thailand.
 
 
If Agustin, who is also working towards a minor in environmental science, travels an hour out of the city she can explore national parks and islands full of lush trees, wildlife and see the occasional snake slithering by her.

Agustin is interning at  The Centre for People and Forests (RECOFTC), where she is blending her passions for social justice and environmental science. The international organization works to enhance capacities for stronger rights, improved governance and fairer benefits for local people in forest landscapes in seven Asia–Pacific countries through community forestry. 

Community forestry is an approach to land management that emphasizes land is best protected when locals have the right to manage it, as opposed to private companies or governments. Agustin’s work as a monitoring, evaluation and learning intern involves research and collecting data, but she says the goal is community forestry.  

The year-long internship will include the opportunity for her to conduct research toward her undergraduate thesis, which explores the participation of women in land governance in the Mekong region. She has her sights on Nepal or Laos as possible locations because of their rising women’s movements. 
Christiana Agustin 2011 – 2015.jpg



“I would like to identify the challenges they face, and possibly come up with solutions or tools to help them better navigate these spaces so they can make a greater impact in the sustainability of their communities and forest landscapes.”

Her advocacy ties back to her time in politics. Agustin worked as a constituency assistant for her MP Gary Anandasangaree (Scarborough-Rouge Park), then in the Prime Minister’s office in Ottawa this past summer. With a background in outreach, specifically with Filipino and Indigenous communities, she worked with the provincial and federal governments on how to ensure concerns of marginalized groups are considered in policy-making.
“As a person of colour, as a woman and as someone who is young, you don’t always have a voice and there are so many challenges and barriers that are completely out of my control,” she says. “I want to see at a more local level if women have those same barriers.”

Having worked in the local, national and now international spectrums, with help of the Global Learning Travel Fund and a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Scholarship, Agustin encourages students to take a risk on stepping out of your comfort zone.
“It’s only in discomfort where you’ll grow,” she says. That in itself not only speaks to growing professionally but also as an individual and to broaden one’s perspectives on the world.

To see Christiana speaking about women leaders today, click on this link or copy/paste the url below. 

https://www.facebook.com/LeadersToday/videos/1663340947045903/  

                                                       Update   

                                                     9 January 2021


Christiana graduated in 2020 from the University of Toronto, Scarborough campus, with a degree in International Development Studies and Natural Sciences and Environmental Management. She worked as an Outreach and Operations Assistant in the Office of the Prime Minister for the summers of 2018 and 2019.  She recently was a Special Projects Assistant at the International Student Centre at UTSC and is currently the Executive Assistant to the Managing Director and Outreach Advisor at the Liberal Research Bureau of U of T Scarborough.




                 Niamh Haughey     2012 - 2016



Niamh Haughey was a Newman student from 2012–2016. During that time, she played on both the hockey and rugby teams – although several coaches suggested she join other sports. Looking back, Niamh wished she had gotten involved with other sports as well in high school as she now knows the importance of being a well-rounded athlete.


She thanks Ms. Roser and Mr. Mancino for encouraging her to play rugby at Newman. Niamh went on to play in many tours with Rugby Canada (U18, x2 U20, and Maple Leafs). She feels rugby taught her how to play with respect, to both teammates and opponents. It showed her that hard work is just half the battle and the rest is believing in one’s own abilities to be the best. Rugby taught her to be humble – because there is always going to be bigger and better opponents (whether in sport or a career path.)

Niamh Haughey 1 .jpg



After high school Niamh attended Brock University to complete a degree in Physical Education (Honours Program). At Brock she played on both the varsity rugby and hockey teams. Niamh feels that by participating in these sports she walked away with something far greater than sport medals and titles. She acquired pride and respect for sport, people, coaches, and others alike.

Bobsleigh came about after Niamh attended the RBC Training Ground – an athletic combine for all competitors to go and test their speed, strength, power, and endurance against other athletes. In 2018 she attended the regional trials, where they rank the Top 100 athletes in Ontario – she was lucky enough to be one of them. That’s where she was approached to try bobsleigh. Niamh has realized it’s the perfect combination of being a little bit crazy, strong, and powerful – skills she had been developing for years through hockey and rugby. Niamh is a bobsleigh athlete on Team Canada heading for the Olympics.


Niamh Haughey 2 .jpg


Niamh says if she could go back to her Grade 9 self,  she would tell herself to take each day as an opportunity. Each day strive to be better, not just in sport, but also in life, in school, in hobbies and in relationships. If you are just that little bit better one day at a time, then you know you’re going in the right direction.

New-what…!

Niamh thanks everyone at Newman who have helped her be the person and athlete she is today.





                      Rosalyn [Rosie] Kish 2011 - 2015


Rosie Kish attended Blessed Cardinal Newman from 2011 until 2015.  While there, she participated in the Ski/Snowboarding Club and One Community.  After high school Rosie received her undergraduate degree from York University in Environmental Studies. In 2020-2021 she completed her Master’s Degree from the University of Toronto in Environmental Science. Rosie has also earned several academic certificates, such as a Certificate in GIS and Remote Sensing- Geography and Cartography from York University, a Certificate in Data Science and a Certificate in Remote Sensing from the Universidad de Costa Rica. Currently she is working as a Forest Carbon Research Analyst.

Rosalyn Kish.png



Her strong interest in terrestrial carbon accounting has been developed through studying plant functional ecological concepts and their influence on soil biogeochemical processes. The functional response and effect type of a plant species describes how it interacts with disturbances and biogeochemical cycles in its environment. Carbon is a key element to all life on earth and is of particular importance in the 21st century.


Rosie’s ultimate goal is to leverage her skills using Google Earth Engine, Python and machine learning to conserve stored carbon in terrestrial vegetation and soils.