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Toronto Catholic District School Board

Keys to Learning

 

An Autobiography in Five Short Chapters

 

1

I walk down the street.

There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.

I fall in.

I am lost....I am helpless.

It isn't my fault.

It takes me forever to find a way out.

 

2

I walk down the same street.

There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.

I pretend I don't see it.

I fall in again.

I can't believe I'm in the same place.

But, it isn't my fault.

It still takes a long time to get out.

 

3

I walk down the same street.

There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.

I see it there.

I still fall in....it's a habit.

My eyes are open.

I know where I am.

It is my fault.

I get out immediately.

 

4

I walk down the same street.

There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.

I walk around it.

 

5

I walk down another street.

 

By Portia Nelson and found in the book: Bouncing Back by Linda Graham

 

New perspectives are a key to learning and growth. When we choose to utilize our brain's neuroplasticity and rewire our conditioned responses and perspectives toward flexibility and resilience, we get to 'walk down another street.' We don't have to but we have that option. Everyone, young and old alike, should know that we all possess the neural ability to see options where we saw none before. We can also discern what options might be most productive and then choose what course of action we should take. Doing so means we are developing a Growth Mindset....

 

The Growth Mindset

 

Many people assume that superior intelligence or ability is a key to success. But more than three decades of research shows that an overemphasis on intellect or talent—and the implication that such traits are innate and fixed—leaves people vulnerable to failure, fearful of challenges and unmotivated to learn. Teaching people to have a “growth mind-set,” which encourages a focus on “process” rather than on intelligence or talent, produces high achievers in school and in life. Parents and teachers can engender a growth mind-set in children by praising them for their persistence or strategies (rather than for their intelligence), by telling success stories that emphasize hard work and love of learning, and by teaching them about the brain as a learning machine.​

 

 

 

 

 

 For a detailed discussion on Growth Mindset, click on link directly below:

 

                     http://mindsetonline.com/whatisit/about/