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Toronto Catholic District School Board

School History And Tradition

St. Paul Catholic School has been in operation on its present site on Sackville Street, behind St. Paul’s Basilica near the burial site of the hundreds of Irish refugees from the Great Hunger in 1847, since 1959. Similar to St. Paul's Basilica, St. Paul Catholic School has a glorious history.
 St.Paul Old Photo
 
 
The school began in 1842 when two classes, separated by a screen, were opened in St. Paul's Basilica. In 1853 a wooden building was erected on the site of the present St. Paul's Basilica. In its earliest days, St. Paul Catholic School was administered by the De La Salle Brothers and the Sisters of St. Joseph. In 1881 a new school was built on Queen Street adjacent to St. Paul’s Basilica.
 
 
 
St. Paul's Basilica, established in 1822, is the mother church and oldest Catholic community in the Archdiocese of Toronto.  After the Diocese was created in 1841, Bishop Michael Power used St. Paul’s Basilica as his unofficial cathedral until the completion of St. Michael’s Cathedral in 1848.
 
St. Paul Catholic School is synonymous with the concept of Catholic education. In existence for 170 years, our mandate is to live Christ's message through the activities of everyone involved in our community.
 
Our patron, Saint Paul, urges us to carry out our responsibilities with the same zeal and determination that he displayed after his conversion experience on the road to Damascus.  The feast of St. Paul is celebrated on January 25th, the date of St. Paul’s conversion.  On his way to Damascus to arrest a group of Christians, St. Paul was knocked to the ground, struck blind by a heavenly light, and given the message that in persecuting Christians, he was persecuting Christ.  The experience had such a profound spiritual effect on him that he became a Christian.  He was baptized, changed his name to Paul to reflect his new persona, and began travelling and preaching to the Gentiles.  St. Paul wrote a number of letters to various communities he established or who sought his advice.  St. Paul died a martyr in Rome.